Genre: Social Science

Her Right Foot by Dave Eggers

Posted July 15, 2017 by Taryn in Reviews / 0 Comments


I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Her Right Foot by Dave EggersHer Right Foot by Dave Eggers
Published by Chronicle Books on September 19th 2017
Genres: Juvenile Nonfiction, History, Social Science, Politics & Government, United States, 19th Century
Pages: 104
Source: NetGalley
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four-stars

Ages 6-9. A charming picture book about one of the United States’ most recognizable landmarks. The Statue of Liberty has many symbolic features, but it’s her right foot that captures author Dave Egger’s imagination. She’s perpetually in motion! Where is she going? Where has she been?

This book made my heart swell! The conversational style makes it fun to read aloud. The first half is filled with fun facts about the Statue of Liberty, many that were new to me. I loved the paper collage style on many of the pages. It reminded me of how people from different backgrounds came together to create something new. You can see examples of the playful and colorful illustrations on illustrator Shawn Harris’s web page.

Liberty and freedom from oppression are not things you get or grant by standing around like some kind of statue. No! These are things that require action. Courage. An unwillingness to rest.

Her Right Foot tells the story of the Statue of Liberty’s long journey from Paris, France to New York Harbor. She’s a gift of friendship that came to represent hope and freedom for the millions of people seeking refuge and opportunity within America’s shores. The author theorizes on why Lady Liberty’s work will never be done and why she’ll never be content to stand still. It’s a timely reminder that our freedoms and ideals must never be taken for granted. Like the famed statue, we must always remain vigilant and keep moving to protect the values we hold most dear.

LINKS
The Statue of Liberty was built to welcome immigrants – that welcome must not end by Dave Eggers
A NEW COLOSSUS: The story behind the Statue of Liberty’s unexpected transformation into a beacon for refugees and immigrants

four-stars

Weaponized Lies By Daniel J. Levitin

Posted March 9, 2017 by Taryn in Reviews / 3 Comments
Weaponized Lies By Daniel J. Levitin

The most important component of the best critical thinking that is lacking in our society today is humility. It is a simple yet profound notion: If we realize we don’t know everything, we can learn. If we think we know everything, learning is impossible. Who knew a book about numbers could be so entertaining? Weaponized […]

Rest in Power: The Enduring Life of Trayvon Martin by Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin

Posted February 1, 2017 by Taryn in Reviews / 0 Comments
Rest in Power: The Enduring Life of Trayvon Martin by Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin

Five years ago, a neighborhood watch volunteer shot and killed seventeen-year-old Trayvon Martin as he was walking back to the residence he was staying at with his father. The shooter was quickly released, but Trayvon’s parents fought to have him tried in a court of law: “We’re not looking for revenge. We’re looking for justice—the […]

The Best We Could Do by Thi Bui

Posted January 21, 2017 by Taryn in Reviews / 0 Comments
The Best We Could Do by Thi Bui

Empathetic, honest, and emotional. A gorgeously illustrated memoir of a woman who looks to the past to understand her parents and her complicated relationship with them. In 1978, Thi Bui’s parents fled South Vietnam with three young children and one on the way. The Best We Could Do tells the story of them growing up […]

Kindred by Octavia Butler

Posted December 18, 2016 by Taryn in Reviews / 0 Comments
Kindred by Octavia Butler

Without any warning, Dana Franklin is thrust back through time and space. It’s 1976 and she’s settling into her new California apartment when she starts to feel dizzy. Her modern surroundings fade away and suddenly she’s in antebellum Maryland. She seems to be inextricably linked with Rufus Weylin, the young son of a plantation owner. […]

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

Posted May 13, 2016 by Taryn in Reviews / 2 Comments
When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

A short and powerful memoir about living in the face of death. At 36 years old, neurosurgeon Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. When Breath Becomes Air was written in his final months. In this thoughtful and deeply personal memoir, Dr. Kalanithi explains the questions of life-and-death that drove him to become […]

In the Country We Love by Diane Guerrero

Posted April 22, 2016 by Taryn in Reviews / 0 Comments
In the Country We Love by Diane Guerrero

Heart-breaking and politically relevant memoir with an authentic voice. Diane Guerrero, actress in the popular TV shows Orange is the New Black and Jane the Virgin, tells the story of her parents’ deportation and the devastating effect it had on all of their lives. It reveals the circumstances that many undocumented immigrants live with on […]

So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson

Posted February 29, 2016 by Taryn in Reviews / 0 Comments
So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed by  Jon Ronson

2.5 Stars, 3 for the first half and 2 for the second half. Entertaining, but superficial exploration of public shaming in the age of social media. I was expecting fluffy, but this was fluffier than most of the popular social science books I’ve read. It is as much about the author and the process of […]

Becoming Nicole by Amy Ellis Nutt

Posted January 21, 2016 by Taryn in Reviews / 0 Comments
Becoming Nicole by Amy Ellis Nutt

Extremely accessible introduction to gender identity issues. This heartwarming story of an ordinary family fighting to make a safer world for their transgender daughter is both engaging and informative. While the Maines family is central to the book, there is also a ton of information on the science behind gender development. This is one of […]